Madrid Skyline Webcam

A view over the rooftops of Madrid since 2001

Madrid Skyline High Definition Webcam
Current time in Madrid:
Current weather in Madrid

The webcam transmits a high definition 1920×1080 pixel image every 30 seconds.

The camera is pointing WNW toward Madrid-Chamartín Clara Campoamor railway station and the Cuatro Torres Business Area. This includes Torre CEPSA, the tallest building in Spain at 250 metres (820ft) high.

First light today was at 5:29 am and sunrise was at 6:50 am. Sunset will be at 9:45 pm and nightfall will be at 11:06 pm.

The webcam clock is synchronized with the Spanish Navy Observatory (Real Instituto y Observatorio de la Armada) which is the Time Stamping Authority in Spain. Accuracy of the webcam clock is usually ±1 second. Local time zone is CEST (Central European Summer Time) which is UTC +02:00, although Madrid is geographically at UTC -0:15.

Key to buildings

Key to buildings

  • 1 Puerta de Europa are twin office buildings in Plaza de Castilla. Designed by Philip Johnson and John Burgee, built by Fomento de Construcciones y Contratas (FCC) and commissioned in 1996 by the Kuwait Investment Office (hence their initial name ‘Torres KIO’ or ‘KIO Towers’). Leslie E. Robertson Associates provided structural engineering services. Each building is 115m (377ft) tall, has 26 storeys and leans 15° from the vertical, making them the first inclined skyscrapers in the world.
  • 2 Estación de Madrid-Chamartín Clara Campoamor is the second major railway station in Madrid. Designed by Alonso, Corrales y Molezún, and Olaquiaga, and built between 1970 and 1975, although subsequent work would be carried on into the early 1980s.
  • 3 Torre CEPSA, originally known as Torre Repsol then Torre Caja de Madrid, and then Torre Bankia until 2014. Designed by Lord Foster and built by a joint venture of Dragados and Fomento de Construcciones y Contratas (FCC). 250m (820ft) high and 45 storeys, it is the tallest building in Spain and the 4th tallest building in the European Union.
  • 4 Torre PwC, formerly Torre Sacyr Vallehermoso. Designed by Carlos Rubio Carvajal and Enrique Álvarez-Sala Walter and built by Sacyr Vallehermoso. On the upper deck there are 3 wind turbines that produce 2.5kW of power for use in the building. 236m (774ft) and 52 storeys.
  • 5 Torre de Cristal (Glass Tower). Designed by Cesar Pelli and built by Dragados. 249m high (817ft) and 52 storeys, it is the second tallest building in Spain, only 89cm (35 inches) shorter than Torre CEPSA.
  • 6 Torre Espacio (Space Tower). Designed by American architect Henry N. Cobb, a partner in the firm Pei Cobb Freed, and built by OHL. In 2009, it became the new home of the British Embassy in Madrid. In 2010, the Embassy of Canada also moved to Torre Espacio, followed by the Australian and Dutch Embassies. 236m (774ft) high and 57 storeys.
  • 3 4 5 6 The four buildings are known collectively as the CTBA, Cuatro Torres Business Area and are located in the Paseo de la Castellana on the former site of the Ciudad Deportiva of Real Madrid. The area contains the tallest skyscrapers in Spain, and some of the tallest in the European Union.
  • 7 Caleido, often called Quinta Torre (Fifth Tower) as it stands close to the other four skyscrapers of the Cuatro Torres Business Area (CTBA). Designed by Fenwick Iribarren and Serrano-Suñer Arquitectura and built by OHL Desarrollos between 2017 and 2021. 181m (594ft) and 38 storeys.
  • 8 Condado de Treviño 9. Residential building. 78m (256ft) and 23 storeys.

Filomena snowstorm timelapse video

Storm Filomena was a extratropical cyclone in early January 2021 that was most notable for bringing unusually heavy snowfall to parts of Portugal and Spain, with Madrid recording its heaviest snowfall since 1971. The eighth named storm of the 2020–21 European windstorm season, Filomena formed over the Atlantic Ocean close to the Canary Islands on 7 January, subsequently taking a slow track north-eastwards towards the Iberian Peninsula and then eastwards across the Mediterranean Sea.

As Filomena was crossing the Iberian Peninsula, the leading edge of the storm collided with cold air that was being channeled down from the Arctic by an area of high pressure centred over the United Kingdom; the constant supply of cold air and slow movement of Filomena resulted in persistent heavy snowfall, reaching up to 60 cm (24 in) in Madrid. At least 5 people were killed due to the effects of cold weather in Spain during the passage of Filomena: three in Madrid and two in Málaga. Impacts elsewhere were minimal as Filomena moved away from the high to its north, lost its supply of cold air and weakened, and the storm was last noted over Ukraine on 15 January. The storm killed 5 people and caused an estimated €1.8 billion (£1.61 billion; $2.2 billion) in damages.

Night panorama